Takashi Amano Nature Aquarium Complete Works 1985-2009

#1
This is an overall amazing book. I don’t think I could write a very good book review, so I’ll just write down some pros and cons.

Pros:
-Great for personal reading material as well as a coffee table book
-Printed beautifully on high quality paper, Amano did the color correction himself
-Tells you all about the water, equipment, and dosing parameters on every tank
-Lists all the fish and plant species in every tank
-Well translated
-Talks about more than just planted tanks, Amano’s very interesting views on human nature, climate change, photography, time, the natural world, and the automation of society are included as well as stories from his childhood
-Shares stories of how Amano came to invent/discover his revolutionary devices for planted tanks, Amano shrimp, pressurized CO2 injection, and blue-red aquatic grow lights
-Some step-by-step tank builds are included
-The book has a huge wealth of knowledge about planted tanks
-Chronologically sorted, this makes it easier to sort through and also shows how Amano’s aquascaping style changed through the years

Cons:
-Terrible binding, my book fell apart despite being very careful with it. Dozens of other people have had this problem according to online reviews
-Plant and fish names are all in Latin, so you have to be well-versed in aquatics to understand what fish are in the tanks
-Plant and fish stock lists are sometimes inaccurate
-Many typos and odd sentences, but this can be expected in any Japanese-English translation
-Many sections of text are out of order as to where they should be in the book
-The book is quite expensive, especially when the covers and spine can peel off when you first open it
-Amano seems to view himself as a genius, criticizing other people’s work and giving no credit to others for his work

Overall a great, high quality book with stunning pictures and great insights into the natural world and planted tanks. Just be ready for a few odd translations and handle the book carefully.
 

Andy Sager

Well-Known Member
#2
For what it's worth, the most accurate way of describing fish/plant species is by their Latin names as they can have different regional common names. I know of at least 1 fish that has 4 different common names based on where they are in the U.S. They all have the same Latin name. ;) So while I wouldn't put this as a "con", your other "cons" about the book do give pause about purchasing it. Thanks for the review. (y)
 
#3
For what it's worth, the most accurate way of describing fish/plant species is by their Latin names as they can have different regional common names. I know of at least 1 fish that has 4 different common names based on where they are in the U.S. They all have the same Latin name. ;) So while I wouldn't put this as a "con", your other "cons" about the book do give pause about purchasing it. Thanks for the review. (y)
I enjoy the Latin names too, I can usually tell what fish it is from memory or from looking at the pictures and I enjoy the accuracy as well, but beginners may have a hard time with the book. That’s why I included that.
 

Andy Sager

Well-Known Member
#4
I enjoy the Latin names too, I can usually tell what fish it is from memory or from looking at the pictures and I enjoy the accuracy as well, but beginners may have a hard time with the book. That’s why I included that.
(y)
 

Brenna

Stalking you silently
Staff member
#5
Good review, the book reviews do not need to be fancy or professional so don't worry about that! I take issue with the binding being so shotty. Makes me not consider buying the book.
 

discusbreeder

Well-Known Member
#6
If you actually want to know what fish you have you need the Latin name, example: in the industry there are ten species I know of sold as kribensis, only one of these is truly kribensis and the rest are congenor species.

Larry
 

Navigator Black

Some odd mod.
Staff member
#7
The Latin is a plus, as where I live, we use several languages. All fishkeepers use Latin names, even beginners. It makes it easier to communicate, whether you speak English, French, Spanish or Mandarin. We just butcher the pronunciation from our first fish tank onwards. Otherwise, every fish has too many names, and the names are applied to several species (see "parrots", "zebras:" etc).

Amano tanks have short legs. They can be stunning, but very few remain so for long.
 
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