New tank setup

corywand

Active Member
#1
I plan to get a tank (either a 20 long or a 29) on Sunday, and start fishless cycling it this week. My danios are still ill in assorted ways. Is it a bad idea to start cycling a new tank while dealing with disease in the current one?
Is there anything else I should know here?
Thanks.
 

corywand

Active Member
#2
This is my new tank cycling shopping list. Am I missing anything?

Tank
Filter-probably an Aquaclear
Heater-100 watts? I use a 50 watt on my 10 gallon, so I’d assume so
Gravel vac
Filter sponges, if the filter doesn’t come with them
Thermometer

LPS/LFS supplies I’m not getting tomorrow:
Driftwood
Live plants, possibly
Lighting
The fish themselves

As well as non-LPS supplies, which I might or might not get tomorrow:
Another 5 mL syringe
Some sort of sand substrate

Things I already own:
Ammonia
5-gal bucket, never used with the sick tank
Test kit
 

Ohio Mark

Well-Known Member
#3
This is my new tank cycling shopping list. Am I missing anything?

Tank
Filter-probably an Aquaclear
Heater-100 watts? I use a 50 watt on my 10 gallon, so I’d assume so
Gravel vac
Filter sponges, if the filter doesn’t come with them
Thermometer

LPS/LFS supplies I’m not getting tomorrow:
Driftwood
Live plants, possibly
Lighting
The fish themselves

As well as non-LPS supplies, which I might or might not get tomorrow:
Another 5 mL syringe
Some sort of sand substrate

Things I already own:
Ammonia
5-gal bucket, never used with the sick tank
Test kit
It looks like a well-planned list to me.
 

corywand

Active Member
#8
How much do I need to worry about contaminating the new tank with whatever is killing the fish in the old one? I’ve been told that aquatic bacteria can’t survive for long on dry surfaces, but what about surfaces that spend most of their time wet? Could my sink be harboring fish-killing bacteria?

Do I need a lid for the tank?

Where does one get sand for a substrate? Are there any brands that are particularly reliable or unreliable?

Do live plants need to be quarantined?
 

Ohio Mark

Well-Known Member
#9
How much do I need to worry about contaminating the new tank with whatever is killing the fish in the old one? I’ve been told that aquatic bacteria can’t survive for long on dry surfaces, but what about surfaces that spend most of their time wet? Could my sink be harboring fish-killing bacteria?

Do I need a lid for the tank?

Where does one get sand for a substrate? Are there any brands that are particularly reliable or unreliable?

Do live plants need to be quarantined?
I wish I had the answer on the contamination...
But you definitely want a lid! It helps keep the water clean, slows down evaporation, and keeps fish from leaping to their deaths.
I bought sand online from Foster & Smith and amazon. More expensive, but in our area it beat the alternatives.
I have never quarantined plants. (Though I should have rinsed for snails.)
I'm curious what others will have to add.
 

discusbreeder

Well-Known Member
#10
On contamination from old tank:
Either get separate gear for the second tank or sterilize equipment when you move from tank to tank. This is why your LFS uses net soak.
On quqrqntine:
After stack is added and before any new stock is added everything, including plants and decorations, should be quarantined. Decorations should be dis-infected and thoroughly rinsed then placed in QT tank with sacrificial to insure rinse was thorough enough. Plants should be thoroughly rinsed and QTed for hitchhikers.
On substrate sand:
you either want eroded sand or sandblaster discharge sand. Either one must be thoroughly rinsed until discoloration in water is gone. Go to local building materials supply, If their play sand is from a different source than their construction sand, buy play sand. Do not use construction sand in aquaria, it has sharp edges and will injure fish, especially catfish. Do not use play sand for concrete, it will have no sharp carners to set to and fall right apart.

Larry
 

corywand

Active Member
#11
On contamination from old tank:
Either get separate gear for the second tank or sterilize equipment when you move from tank to tank. This is why your LFS uses net soak.
I have separate equipment for the tank itself. I’m worried about things that have come into contact with the old tank and that aren’t as easily replaced. I’m not getting a new sink for this, and there are probably food safety issues with switching to the kitchen one.
 

junebug

Chune the Smiter
Staff member
#12
I have separate equipment for the tank itself. I’m worried about things that have come into contact with the old tank and that aren’t as easily replaced. I’m not getting a new sink for this, and there are probably food safety issues with switching to the kitchen one.
I wouldn't worry too much about that. Most aquatic diseases die after being dry for a long time. Also, if you're using a bathroom sink, presumably that bathroom has been cleaned occasionally (one hopes anyway! haha) and most bathroom cleaners include disinfectants.
 

toolman

Well-Known Member
Pro Recruiter
#13
Corywand, I use pool filter sand for my substrate. Its cheap, inert and easy to find, plus I have a pool so I always have some on hand. The only downside is the light color, but I like light colored tanks.

If you want a darker colored tank,you can use black diamond blasting media from Tractor Supply Store. If you use bdbm be sure to rinse itreally well as it sometimes has an oily ressidue. I had a friend who got a bad batch and had to redo her tank.
 

Navigator Black

Some odd mod.
Staff member
#14
You have to check pool sand - here stores carry two colours - a sandy brown and a dark dark grey. It's heavy stuff and likely to be locally sourced, so it should vary across a country. I've also seen white and greenish filter sand.

Quarantining is always good. I would not worry about sinks and such. Everything in the disease you've described shouts bad conditions along the route to your house. Those problems are around. They are generally in the fish, and won't linger on surfaces and such. Avoid net and direct contact, and you are fine.
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
#15
How much do I need to worry about contaminating the new tank with whatever is killing the fish in the old one? I’ve been told that aquatic bacteria can’t survive for long on dry surfaces, but what about surfaces that spend most of their time wet? Could my sink be harboring fish-killing bacteria?

Do I need a lid for the tank?

Where does one get sand for a substrate? Are there any brands that are particularly reliable or unreliable?

Do live plants need to be quarantined?
Just a little thing.
For several years I keep the hose for the aquaria stretched, hanging in the bathroom.
It is a safety not to contaminate from one basin to another.
 

corywand

Active Member
#16
The net from the old tank was placed in the new bucket by mistake. Both were dry, and had been for several days. Is the bucket still okay?
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
#17
The net from the old tank was placed in the new bucket by mistake. Both were dry, and had been for several days. Is the bucket still okay?
Yes, dry is good. The germs can only survive in humid conditions.
In the past, when I sometimes had fish diseases, I even kept the buckets upside down.
But if there are no diseases in the rack, it is less dangerous.
 

NightShade

Well-Known Member
#19
I have to order from reputable online suppliers, or from hobbyists. There are lots here! I have no stores around me that I trust their stock. Just stay away from Big Box for sure! Theres some hobbyists close to you that have suggested good stores to you before (if you have the chance to go to them?), if you remember who they are, tag/ask them.. they know the good stores they go to, and I certainly trust their opinions on these things!!
 

corywand

Active Member
#20
Is Clorox Splash-Less bleach usable for sterilizing tanks? It says on the bottle that it's not for sanitizing things, so I'd assume not.

What bleach is usable for sterilizing tanks?
 
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