Container ponding

Poppa Ryno

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Staff member
#1
Ive always loved ponds. Small, big.... doesnt matter. I used to be around our familys large farm pond alot. I used to catch tadpoles and let em grow up in the pigs water troff (spelling). I've always been drawn to aquatics i guess. So ill share my first attempt at a container pond!
 

Bpfish

Well-Known Member
#2
That's awesome, I used to build ponds professionally when I lived in Northern Virginia. I miss the work sometimes but I don't miss the aching back.
 

Brenna

Stalking you silently
Staff member
#3
Wow to both! My mother used giant flower pots and put feeder goldfish in them a few years ago. I told her not to. Suggested guppies etc. Now we have 4 X 8 inch to 10 inch fish in 2 large tanks in the house. It was cool when they were small but now it's like geez. @Henningc likes to grow fish outdoors. I think this will be a great thread!
 

Poppa Ryno

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#5
I breed gups n bn plecs outside in the suummers. And use them to grow out angels too.
 

Brenna

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#6
None of you had problems with predation? Or are you covering the containers somehow?
 

Poppa Ryno

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#7
Pitbulls keep predation away. Lol.... Mojo truly believed he was the keeper of the pond!

Ill get pics of the pond up once i cook breakfast here at work... Sook tired.
 

Brenna

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#8
Ah yes. Master of the lawns. I don't get much but stray cats and raccoons on occasion in my yard due to the dogs. It's the raccoons I worry about. Last summer we had two huge coons here. Neighbors dispatched them I believe. Just would be sorry to see my fish get eaten overnight.
 

Gillie

Chronic enabler
#9
A friend of mine would have loved to have to have had a coon problem. He had otters, those guys are like ninjas.
 

Brenna

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#10
Hahahaha! We used to have some small swimming critters before they drained the overflow for the water treatment plant. I had a coon hound/rott mix and she could pick up their trails. I'm sure she was someones hunting dog before I had her.
 

Fishobsessed7

Well-Known Member
#12
Only predators I had were cats. I was really worried about dragon flys because we normally have HUGE amounts of them, but I never saw a single one
 

Poppa Ryno

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#13
I will post here about my pond.... As soon as i can getPB to work. Startin to peev me a lil thats its actin up again today.
 

Brenna

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#14
I will post here about my pond.... As soon as i can getPB to work. Startin to peev me a lil thats its actin up again today.
I out Flickr on my tablet. It seems easier to use for me at least but I have PB in my cell. Looking forward to seeing those pics when you can.
 

Poppa Ryno

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Staff member
#15
Its not much.. Abt 400gls. Alm my landlord would allow. But i got a 4ft creek type section to add this year.
 

Brenna

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#16
Any pond is more than I have, so I'm interested. I don't have the room for one really.
 

Henningc

Well-Known Member
#17
As Brenna suspected, I will dive into this conversation. I have been raising fish outdoors for several years now and know a few tricks and have some experience dealing with potential problems that can come up.

As for predators, I have everything except for ducks and otters and I'm not counting them out yet. I did lose two crayfish to coons and figured out a handy trick or two. First if you can rig up a cheap motion detector light that will keep most mammals away. If you need more security go gather up the dog droppings and place them around the container, pool whatever you're using. Marigold flowers work as well but watch out for bees. When I found the two crayfish remains I just used the first thing handy, dog doodoo. It worked. Dragon flys are a bigger issue and even if you live far away from any natural waters they will find you. I've found the only way to deal with them is to net them out. If you're raising cichlids don't worry they take good care of that issue. Your indoor cichlids will love you if you feed them dragonfly larva.

My biggest issue is frogs. They come from nowhere and invade. I have had no fewer than 5,000-10,000 tadpoles every year. Keep in mind I have multiple pools and stock tanks. Leopard frog eggs are a big problem. They don't reproduce until late in the season so by that time my pools have very high fish counts and the weather is extremely hot. The eggs die due to limited oxygen and become toxic. They trun into brown slime / goo and can be easily removed. You will know leopard frog eggs when you see them if you remember my description. As for all other frogs, the tadpoles need to be thinned out as there is no natural predation. Cichlids will eat them when they are less than 2 weeks old. After the first few weeks they become foul tasting and the fish will not eat them. Best thing is to remove and relocate the tadpoles far away. Bullfrogs and Green frog adults will eat fish and need to be removed by what ever means necessary. If you have no wooded areas or natural waters around they will not come calling. The primary frogs I deal with are green, gray and barking tree frogs. I thought it was funny the first couple of years as a few frogs would croak all night. Due to a lack or predation, we now have 50-60 adults singing and it can be a bit noisy. They are easily captured at night with a flashlight and net. These guys can survive anywhere so feel free to relocate them around folks you don't like!! Just kidding, sort of. I also wanted to say that I put 2-4 plastic coffee can lids in each pool for the baby frogs can get out of the water.

Last summer I had the following pools and stock tanks: (2)- P1 8' X 8' Intex Pools, (1)-P2 72"x 110" Intex Pool, (2) P3 10' X 10' Intex Pools, (2) 100gal Stock Tanks and (2) 150gal Stock Tanks. TheP1,2,3 is just my record keeping designation for the pool size. I also had a lot of 5gal buckets and a few rubbermade totes that ended up inhabited by accident. In the past I have used the totes, but they tend to get very brittle at the end of the summer and could crack up unexpectedly. I also used hard plastic kiddie pools, but a word of caution they are very shallow and heat up quickly if not shaded. This summer I plan to use the same set up only add 2-3 more 100gal stock tanks. All of the pools I use are Intex and be warned that most other brands have anti-algae / algaecide in the plastic. It is toxic and will kill off your fish. The stock tanks are all plastic / rubberized material. I have also discovered you can leave both pools and stock tanks outdoors all winter as long as you fill them up. If you take this route than make sure to get all the leaves out after they fall. If you miss a few no problem, but if you leave large numbers you will have a cleaning job come spring.

I'll add to my comments and eventually tell you all you need to know, or as much as I know, in later posts.
 

Brenna

Stalking you silently
Staff member
#18
My mom has decided she wants the goldfish outside come summer. How much do the stock tanks run? We do have natural water running next to the house along with down the street so frogs and dragonflies are an issue. The first time she tried pools of the kiddie kind we got bull frogs. Lol
 

Brenna

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#20
I thought of a couple more questions. Will goldfish that are 8 to 10 inches eat dragonfly larva?
I've been thinking of maybe trying to dig up one of flower beds and putting a stock tank in and then adding rock work to the outside, instead of using a liner or molded pond. Would that work? What about a water feature? Do the outdoor pools need aeration? The flower bed in question annoys me and I didn't create it so... hehe. Dad and I would have to do some electric though and Brenna would have to do the digging for the stock tank.
 
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