Boat Pond

FishFlow

Well-Known Member
#1
1) Chat is awesome. Best group of people on the planet.

I've been kicking the idea of making a tub pond from all the discussion on this site, and while discussing it (again) in chat. I thought....



This might make a good tub pond. :D

This boat came with the house. Not sure what it was used for. I filled it up with dirt, to hold dirt. I'll get some measurements tonight, and empty it out and see if it holds water this weekend!

1st tub pond for me. No idea what I'm doing. A local friend has tub ponds and says Vals grow like crazy in them. I like vals, and think i'll shoot for vals.

Additionally, I'm going to want some sort of water feature. water fall sound of some sort. could just be pump pointing up.

I am located in Central California. (no where near the "bay area" ;P ) Annual average temp is in 68.6, average low is 46.6.
 

NightShade

Well-Known Member
#2
YEP!! Awesome pond idea, as we said in chat!!! I can't wait to see this progress!!!! :D

I will let other more experienced pond people chime in with advice... but paint the outside a nice color, and add pretty plants, and you're on your way LOL!!

I am doing my first too, so we can learn together!! :)
 

Poppa Ryno

Moderator
Staff member
#3
This could be very cool!
Yes, vals do excellent in container ponds.
Im excited to see this project.
 

FishFlow

Well-Known Member
#5
Measured it. from tip to back (sorry, not a boat person.) 7'. widest width is 3'7". and 12" deep.

Not going to be as many gallons as I hoped. Rough guessing, ~ 120 gallons or less.

Should have time to empty the dirt out after work and get a better look at it.

If it does leak, I'll give fiberglass work a shot!
 

OnTheFly

Well-Known Member
#6
Measured it. from tip to back (sorry, not a boat person.) 7'. widest width is 3'7". and 12" deep.

Not going to be as many gallons as I hoped. Rough guessing, ~ 120 gallons or less.

Should have time to empty the dirt out after work and get a better look at it.

If it does leak, I'll give fiberglass work a shot!
You might even find a quick smear of silicone works fine as long as the leak isn't hiding behind a boat seam. The prep work really matters if you want it to seal for years. I would set it up on the concrete blocks I see in the pic. Add a little water and see if it leaks. If you find a leak clean the repair area down well, scuff it with a pad or coarse sandpaper, and allow it to dry. It's worth the bit of effort. I have used fiberglass and silicone to repair boats and autos since the 1970's. Apply it to a clean rough surface and it will literally last for decades. Fiberglass is great if you need to pour the resin into a semi-hidden seam. Avoid it if it's unnecessary as it is messy to work with. RTV silicone is much easier to use if you can get to the damaged area with a finger. Nothing will stick to dirt since this boat is already a flower pot. It's a neat pond idea and worth an afternoon of piddling around to seal it up right IMO. And a 120 tub is fine based in the temps you shared on chat. Even 50Gs stays temp stable enough for a lot of species.
 

Brookster123

Resident nuisance/moderator
Staff member
#7
Dude! I love it!! Couple ideas... pressure wash it and sand it, clean and coat the whole thing in pond paint, 80% one of those rivets is going to leak. Here's my big one... get an old junk out board motor and make it a waterfall!!! If you don't I will;)
 

OnTheFly

Well-Known Member
#10
Too easy but I would fiberglass it if the holes are as large as they look. You don't have to sand the fiberglass so you'll only hate it for an hour or two. :) I'll post a link and show you what you need but you can get it at any local discount auto parts store or probably even Wal-Mart. Won't be expensive. Easy to talk you through the process.

Something like this will work. Brand doesn't matter. This link is for a quart of resin and hardener. A pint would be enough the fix those holes and others if you find them.

https://www.amazon.com/3M-20122-Pur...1&refRID=6ZS9PGE58JPDK52JAJNQ#customerReviews

Some fiberglass reinforcing matte or cloth would help for the larger holes. I'll mail some you of that if you want to pay shipping. It will fit in a large envelope. Probably find some at Autozone for $5 locally.
 
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OnTheFly

Well-Known Member
#15
I would silicone the holes at the very least. Unless they are much smaller than they appear flex seal is going to fail and dump your pond. It's not meant to seal large holes. You could probably flex seal the transom if you wish. If there are no holes on the outside of the transom it doesn't matter what the wood looks like.
 

OnTheFly

Well-Known Member
#17
I'm not afraid to play with fiberglass either. It's been several decades, but have played with it before on the family boat. (although the commercials, it seems flex seal should work just as well. ? )
It's your project but IMO not even close to as good for a hole. An hour of glassing and the big holes will be strong. Flex seal is basically spray tar. At the very least put a huge glob of silicone over the holes. That should last a year or two. You aren't going fishing :)
 

FishFlow

Well-Known Member
#18
I would silicone the holes at the very least. Unless they are much smaller than they appear flex seal is going to fail and dump your pond. It's not meant to seal large holes. You could probably flex seal the transom if you wish. If there are no holes on the outside of the transom it doesn't matter what the wood looks like.
I tried silicon. the fiberglass is pretty thin. and the holes on the bottom are about 1/4" While the boat was still wet, I don't think the holes are deep enough (and too wide) for silicon to work well. Zoom in on yellow box. that's the 2nd hole. I believe the hole is part of the design of this "planter" box. (drain hole)

 
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